INSTRUCTIONS FOR KIENINGER GRANDFATHER CLOCKS

INSTRUCTIONS FOR KIENINGER (KSU) GRANDFATHER CLOCKS

WHEN HANDLING EXPOSED BRASS PARTS, USE SOFT COTTON GLOVES TO PREVENT TARNISHING.

Kieninger KSU Grandfather Clock Movement
Kieninger KSU Grandfather Clock Movement

1. SETTING UP The GRANDFATHER CLOCK
Set clock upright on solid surface. Remove all packing material from inside of Grandfather Clock. Set up clock where you want it and level on side and front of waist.
(THERE ARE LEVELING FEET IN EACH CORNER ON BOTTOM OF CLOCK.) MAKE
SURE CLOCK IS LEVEL.

2. ATTACHING PENDULUM
Attach the pendulum on the leader.

3. ATTACHING WEIGHTS
Attach the weights on the pulleys, making sure the cable is in the groove around the pulley. When facing the clock (On Grandfather Clocks, the weight on the left weighs approximately 7 lb., the center and the one on the right approximately 9 lb.,
On Grandmother Clocks, the weight on the left and center weighs approximately 7 lb., the one on the right approximately 9 lb.)
The pulleys are packed separately. The end of the cable goes through the pulley and up to the bottom of the clock movement. Look at the bottom of the weights to see if they may be marked: L or C or R for Left, Center and Right facing the clock.

4. STARTING CLOCK
Hold pendulum on bottom and push all the way to the left or right, hold steady and release. (YOUR CLOCK IS EQUIPPED WITH AN AUTOMATIC BEAT ADJUSTMENT AND AS THE PENDULUM SWING SLOWS, THE VERGE WILL SET ITS OWN BEAT)

5. WINDING THE CLOCK
Insert the crank into each keyhole in the dial and turn the crank counterclockwise to the left. A clicking noise while
winding is normal. Crank up the weights until against.

 

  • The left weight is for the strike.
  • The center weight for the time.
  • The right weight is for the quarter hour chime and chime melody.

 

 

Letting the weights go all the way to the bottom will not damage the clock if you forget to pull up the weights.

6. SETTING THE TIME
To set the Kieninger grandfather clock to the correct time, move the minute hand clockwise or counterclockwise. There is no need to stop every quarter hour to let it chime. If the chiming cycle does not correspond to the time shown by the hands, it will self-correct within
two hours. When moving the minute hand past the 12:00 o’clock position, (stop at 12:00) wait until it is finished chiming and striking then advance to the correct time.

7. SELECTING THE CHIMES
To select either the Westminster, St. Michael or Whittington chimes, shift the chime selector lever on the right-hand side of the dial, (beside the 3). The chimes can also be silenced. To silence the hour strike, shift the lever on the left-hand side of the dial,
(beside the 9). (IF YOUR CLOCK IS EQUIPPED WITH THE AUTOMATIC NIGHT SHUT-OFF FEATURE, MOVE THE
LEVER ON THE LEFT TO THE CENTER POSITION AND THE CLOCK WILL NOT CHIME OR STRIKE FROM 10:15 PM TO 7:00 AM) If clock strikes at 10:15 PM to 7:00 AM with auto shut-off engaged, advance hands 12 hours. (See No 6, setting the time)

DO NOT MOVE THE CHIME OR STRIKE SELECTING LEVERS WHILE THE CLOCK IS CHIMING OR STRIKING
8. TIMING THE CLOCK
To regulate clock if it gains, turn the rating nut on the bottom of the pendulum bob to the left to lower the bob. If it loses, turn the rating nut to the right to raise the bob.

9. SETTING THE MOON DIAL
The arch of the moon dial is calibrated into 29-1/2 days, corresponding to the lunar month. There are 59 teeth cut around the edge of the moon disc. A small gear is mounted on the hand shaft to mesh with the larger wheel near the hand shaft. This
train of wheels moves the disc forward at a speed of 1/2 a revolution in 29-1/2 days, completing the lunar month.
The moon dial is as accurate as it is practical to make it. Actually, it is a trifle off, and if you watch the moon phase, you will have to adjust it every few months. The moon actually circles the earth in an average of 27 days, 7 hours, 43.2 minutes, and the period of time from the new moon is 29 days, 12 hours, and 44.05 minutes, not the exact 29-1/2 days measured by your clock.
The moon disk can be moved by hand in the back of the dial. Place the moon exactly beneath No. 15 on the moon dial.
Using a calendar, determine the number of days since the last full moon. Move the moon disk, one click in a clockwise direction for every day since full moon, .e.g., the moon is five days after full moon, move the moon disk five clicks. Should the moon gears be active, the disk cannot be turned. Move the minute hand clockwise (as many hours as needed) to take the gears out of action, then set the moon disk and readjust the time.

10. SERVICING YOUR CLOCK
We recommend having your clock oiled every three years by a professional clockmaker.
Your clock is a precision instrument, but it will remain so only with regular upkeep.
Never use sewing machine oil or spray lubricants.

TO ADJUST CHIME HAMMERS
During handling, the chime hammers may become bent out of adjustment causing improper tone in chiming. The chime
hammers are attached to thin brass wires, which may be bent to bring the hammers into proper alignment. From the sides of the grandfather clock, check the position of the hammers. The hammers should rest about 1/8 inch away from the chime rods. They should be aligned to strike the center of the rods. The hammers should not touch or rub against each other.
1 Chimes will sound dull or muted if hammers rest on the rod. To correct, bend the hammer away from the rod.
2 Chimes are not clear. One or more notes may not be heard. Hammers are to far from the rod. To correct, bend the
hammer toward the rod.
3 The Westminster chimes will operate in the following sequence:
· Quarter hour — 4 notes
· Half hour— 8 notes
· Three-quarter hour— 12 notes
· Hour chime— 16 notes
4 The Whittington and the ST. Michael chimes will operate in the following sequence:
· Quarter hour — 8 notes
· Half hour— 16 notes
· Three-quarter hour— 24 notes
· Hour chime— 32 notes
5 Immediately following the hour chime the correct hour will be struck.

TROUBLE SHOOTING CHECKLIST
If your clock is not operating properly, the following adjustments can be made quite easily:
1. CLOCK DOES NOT RUN
a. Check that all three weights are fully wound.
b. Check to see that all packing material is out of the clock.
c. Check the clock hands. If the hands are catching on each other, bend the minute hand away from the hour hand.
2. CLOCK IS NOT CHIMING PROPERLY
a. It is normal if the chime sequence is disturbed after setting the clock to the correct time. Within two hours, the chime
sequence will correct itself.
b. If the clock continues to chime out of sequence, perform the following adjustment:
i. Manually turn the clock through two hours, stopping at each quarter hour to allow it to chime. If, when the full
hour chime sequence (16 notes) is sounded, the minute hand is not at the 12:00 position, remove the hand nut,
pull off the minute hand and position it to point at 12:00. Replace the hand nut.
c. If the chiming cycle starts a few minutes before or after the quarter hour position, perform the following adjustment:
i. Move the minute hand to the next quarter hour SLOWLY and note the position of the hand when chiming
started. Remove the hand nut and the minute hand. Grasp the small bushing under the minute hand securely with pliers and move the hand in the direction to make it coincide with the correct quarter-hour mark.

3. CLOCK IS NOT COUNTING THE CORRECT HOUR
a. If the hour hand and the hour struck do not match, perform the following adjustment:
i. Manually chime the clock until the full hour is sounded and the hour is struck. Push the hour hand firmly until it is pointing at the hour just struck. The hour hand is on the shaft friction tight. If it is too loose, remove the hour and slightly squeeze together the projecting part on the back of the hand. Replace the hour hand by pointing it to the
correct hour.

New Grandfather Clocks can be seen here.

4 Comments

  1. Grandfather Clocks
    | Permalink

    There is a lever mounted on the face of the movement behind the dial of the grandfather clock dial that “steps” the hour count. If your clock has not been oiled on a regular basis (every 5 years or so), this may happen. It may be jammed causing the hour strike to continue well beyond it’s stopping point. It could also be a spring with improper tension. It is not a major problem for a grandfather clock. This is not a user fix and would suggest finding a good clock tech who could come to your home and correct it.

  2. Robert Halliday
    | Permalink

    Hello,
    I am a clock hobbyist that just built a grandfather clock. I have an older Kieninger movement . It has 04 K stamped on the backplate. The movement runs, and keeps time accurately. Is it normal for a cable driven movement to stop while winding.
    Thank you, Bob Halliday

  3. Grandfather Clocks
    | Permalink

    Hi Bob,

    It is normal for the clock movement to disengage while the clock is being wound on most Kieninger and Hermle movements. There are a few high end Kieninger grandfather clock movements that will continue while winding. I actually set my clock at home to run about 7 seconds fast a week to compensate for the loss of power to the movement during winding. For years I only needed to set the time on that grandfather clock twice a year for DST.

    It is always a good idea to give the pendulum a little push after winding to sustain the swing so the clock will continue to run.

    Thanks!
    Robert

  4. Robert Halliday
    | Permalink

    Thank you for the information. I don’t remember the clock stopping when first got it. Maybe I just did not notice. This movement has the auto night shut off. The face has the remote chime, and night shut off selector. Can the mfg date be established from the 04 K .This is a 93 cm movement.
    Thanks again, Bob Halliday